“Trying to Close a Knowledge Gap, Word by Word”

Trying to Close a Knowledge Gap, Word by Word is an article and video from The New York Times that gives a pretty good over of research, concerns and potential strategies related to the “word gap.”

It includes discussion about the Rhode Island that’s inserting recording devices into children’s clothing, which I have previously posted about skeptically (though I’ve tried to maintain an open mind).

You can find those posts, as well as others, at The Best Resources For Learning About The “Word Gap.”

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Worst Idea Of The Year: Don’t Attend Parent-Teacher Conference? Then We’ll Ban You From Attending Graduation Of Your Child

The Cobb County School Board is considering a member’s suggestion that if a parent doesn’t attend a teacher conference, then the parent could be banned from attending their child’s graduation.

Here’s a news report on the proposal:

This is a definite addition to The Worst Parent Engagement Ideas.

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Video: “21st Century School Libraries, Parent Engagement and Student Achievement”

21st Century School Libraries, Parent Engagement and Student Achievement is the title of an interactive video that the Ontario Library Association has created.

You can see it here.

Here’s how they describe it:

[The video] empowers parents to support school libraries and thus encourage reading engagement and information literacy with their children. It contains information on how parents can support libraries in their child’s school, and resources that can help to plan literacy-based events for children, including lunchtime book clubs and family literacy events.

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“Hidden Causes of Low Parental Engagement in Urban Schools and What to Do About It”

Hidden Causes of Low Parental Engagement in Urban Schools and What to Do About It is the topic of a new short episode at BAM Radio.

There’s a good discussion on the program, though I suspect that readers of this blog aren’t going to learn anything new. A couple of the positive comments about using charter schools as a model seem a bit simplistic and don’t recognize the “creaming” aspects of those schools. Nevertheless, I think it’s worth listening to….

By the way, I wasn’t able to get the site to play the audio in Firefox, but it worked fine in Chrome.

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